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What is Direct Primary Care? A Student Doctor Shares His View

Posted by on Jun 27, 2013 in Blog, DPC News | 0 comments

What is Direct Primary Care? A Student Doctor Shares His View

Fed up of its unreliability and low payout, many physicians are switching from Medicare to concierge medicine or direct primary care. Although still a first year medical student, StudentDoctor Thompson has made an impressive review of Direct Primary Care which he shared in this YouTube video. He made the annotation below to introduce the video:   Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXBUZ9yFu6w If you are new to the direct primary care model, watch the video below to understand why more and more physicians and patients are choosing individualized healthcare over “mass medicine”. Due to Congress and the government’s healthcare reform, physicians who own their own practice will find it very difficult to stay in private practice. Their only recourse is to choose concierge medicine. Get more information about the benefits of direct primary care by following this...

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More Doctors Move Away From Medicare to Direct Primary Care

Posted by on Jun 27, 2013 in DPC News | 0 comments

More Doctors Move Away From Medicare to Direct Primary Care

Direct primary care or concierge medicine is attracting more doctors who have had enough of the paperwork, low payout, and pressures of Medicare. In his article entitled 1 in 10 Doctor Practices Flee Medicare To Concierge Medicine, Forbes.com’s healthcare specialist Bruce Japsen writes:   Read the Full Article As the federal government gets more involved in mass medicine, a growing number of doctors got fed up with the red tape, overhead, low payment, and the limited number of patients that they can see which prevents them from earning a sustainable income.   Source:  http://www.forbes.com/sites/brucejapsen/2013/01/30/1-in-10-doctor-practices-flee-medicare-to-concierge-medicine/ This move from mass healthcare to individualized medicine will enable physicians who own their practice to receive payment directly from their patients, without the difficulties and unreliability linked to Medicare. Here are more excerpts from Bruce Japsen’s article: The movement is across all medical disciplines with 6.8 percent of all physicians planning to stop taking insurance in favor of concierge-style medicine or so-called “direct primary care.”   “Physicians have been running for cover for several years now,” said Mark Smith, president of Merritt Hawkins. “There is a lot of uncertainty in health care now and the only certainty is there is a lot of talk about cutting physicians fees. One way to get out of it is to go off the grid.” Read the Full Article At this moment, direct primary care gains more support from patients and doctors who want to show the Obama administration and Congress that this model can provide better healthcare at a lower cost. To learn more about the benefits of direct primary care, visit  http://www.DPCNews.com for more...

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Cost-Saving Health Care Benefits Options for Small Businesses

Posted by on Aug 7, 2012 in Blog, DPC News | 0 comments

Cost-Saving Health Care Benefits Options for Small Businesses

With the high cost of health insurance, small businesses who want to offer health benefits to their workers are often saddled with paying higher premiums than the big businesses. However, there are several cost-saving options that small businesses can use and still stay afloat.   Clipped from: www.businessfinancestore.com   In an article written for BusinessFinanceStore.com, author Clay Wyatt enumerates the various ways small businessmen can offer health benefits without going bankrupt. Among the options are using tax credits, joining health insurance pools, and offering high-deductible plans and HSA’s. One of the best options is the offering of Direct Primary Care to the workers. Direct primary care (DPC) is a relatively new way to pay for medical expenses. It allows the member to pay a fixed monthly fee in exchange for basic medical services. These include email and phone access to a doctor, coverage for routine office visits and other similar items. Note that DPC plans typically do not cover surgeries or other highly-expensive procedures, so it is best to combine DPC plans with high-deductible health insurance plans. From www.businessfinancestore.com The main concept behind DPC is that members are allowed virtually direct and unlimited medical care access for an affordable fixed monthly fee and are freed from the soaring cost of health insurance. To understand more about Direct Primary Care, visit http://www.DPCNews.com for more...

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In-Store Clinics Eyed as Solution for Primary Care Doctor Shortage

Posted by on Jul 31, 2012 in Blog, DPC News | 0 comments

In-Store Clinics Eyed as Solution for Primary Care Doctor Shortage

As the country faces a severe shortage of primary care physicians, as much as 40,000 by the year 2020, the 30,000,000 people who would benefit from the Affordable Care Act will have to get their checkups at Wal-Mart or the local pharmacy to relieve the strain on the overburdened primary care network. In his article for the Los Angeles Times, author Chad Terhune wrote that in-store clinics will get more attention as consumers experience longer wait times at the doctor’s office when the Affordable Care Act becomes federal law in 2014.   Clipped from: www.latimes.com   Pharmacy giant CVS Caremark Corp., Target Corp. and other retailers are aiming to help alleviate the doctor shortage with hundreds of walk-in clinics run by nurses to treat ear infections and other routine ailments and increasingly help people suffering from chronic illnesses. These companies, after struggling to turn a profit from these clinics for the last decade, are now eager to capitalize on an influx of newly insured patients. From www.latimes.com These retail clinics will be a welcome solution for the uninsured who have to wait for as long as three hours at county-run medical clinics.   These clinics are already popular with consumers who like the idea of strolling in for care with no appointment seven days a week. They are typically small operations adjacent to the pharmacy where one nurse practitioner may see patients and handle billing. There are no doctors on site. From www.latimes.com Because these walk-in clinics allow visits with no appointments any day of the week, people who don’t want to miss work can get care on evening hours or weekends, and at way less cost.   These in-store clinics have performed well thus far. Studies by Rand found that these clinics provide care at costs that are 30% to 40% less than similar care provided at a physician’s office and that the care for routine illnesses was of similar quality. From www.latimes.com To understand more on direct primary care, please visit DPCNews.com  for more information....

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Can Non-Insurance Direct Primary Healthcare Networks Work?

Posted by on Jul 23, 2012 in Blog, DPC News | 0 comments

Can Non-Insurance Direct Primary Healthcare Networks Work?

Several healthcare providers which follow the direct primary care model are doing away with traditional health insurance plans. Because they aim to provide affordable primary care to as many people as possible, these healthcare providers charge their patients an unbelievingly low fixed monthly fee for unlimited office visits with DPC physicians. In an article  written for TIME Healthland, author Anita Hamilton writes about today’s leading health care services and how they made it easy and affordable for patients to access primary healthcare.   Clipped from: healthland.time.com   The specific terms and fees vary by service. For instance, Qliance charges each of its 4,000 patients $49 to $89 per month, depending on age. Some providers require year-long contracts, while others let members cancel at any time. What they all share is a monthly fee of no more than $89, no need for patients to have health insurance, and no limits on pre-existing conditions. From healthland.time.com While it has a lot of features found only in the more expensive healthcare plans that cater to the wealthy, direct primary healthcare should not be mistaken for concierge medicine.   As with regular primary care providers, these services handle things like flu shots, routine physicals and consultations for a variety of health problems, from rashes to allergies to dizziness. They can also serve as the initial point of contact for more serious conditions such as mental illness or sexually transmitted disease and will see patients of all ages. From healthland.time.com Since the direct primary healthcare model is not insurance, it eliminates insurance-associated costs that don’t have a positive effect on patient well-being by 40% or more. Clearly, DPC has made health care accessible even to the uninsured.   Cutting out the insurance middleman enables direct primary care providers to stay afloat without charging patients a fortune. An estimated $.30 of every dollar in revenue at a typical primary care practice goes toward dealing with insurance companies, according to Norm Wu, founder of Qliance. But although their monthly fees may be low, there are plenty of add-on costs, which consumers should know about before signing up for a plan. From healthland.time.com To understand more about the benefits of Direct Primary Care, visit  DPCNews.com for more information.  ...

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Why Doctors Should Consider Switching to Direct Primary Care Models

Posted by on Jul 19, 2012 in Blog, DPC News | 0 comments

Why Doctors Should Consider Switching to Direct Primary Care Models

So much has been written about how direct primary care has confronted many challenges with a large number of primary care doctors saying they’re set to leave medical practice if they could. Doctors who are willing to move to a DPC model will find a lot of benefits that will make the switch worthy of consideration. Doctors will have more time with their patients and spend less time in insurance payment hassle. Malpractice premiums will be reduced by 50% and doctors will have more take home pay.   Clipped from: www.kevinmd.com (share this clip)   In his interesting article written for KevinMD.com, Avado CEO and author David Chase wrote: I predict in under two years that the primary care physician who doesn’t have at least 10% of their patients paying this way will be the exception to the rule. The economics and results are simply too compelling to ignore. Consider that the byproduct has been the following: Combining a DPC model with a high deductible wrap-around policy saves 20-50% off of a typical health premium for a higher level service DPC physicians are taking home 50-100% more income (or scaling back hours) Patient satisfaction rates exceed Google and Apple Downstream costs for the most expensive facets of healthcare (surgical, specialist & ED visits) are reduced 40-80% From www.kevinmd.com  ...

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How 2 Hardly Noticed Provisions of Obamacare Can Have Serious Effect on Health Insurers

Posted by on Jul 19, 2012 in Blog, DPC News | 0 comments

How 2 Hardly Noticed Provisions of Obamacare Can Have Serious Effect on Health Insurers

Author and health care consultant David Chase, in an article written for KevinMD.com, wrote that there are two underplayed components of Obamacare that offer incredible cost savings and can give a black eye to health insurers.     Two portions of the Health legislation have received little attention yet will have a huge effect on bending the cost curve: 1. Medical Loss Ratio (MLR); 2. Direct Primary Care (aka “Medical Homes”). MLR requires that insurance companies spend at least 80 to 85 percent of their collected premiums on medical services, while the Direct Primary Care provision will offer an affordable alternative that by-passes insurance companies altogether. Taken together, these two provisions could have a long term effect that is likely to be devastating to traditional health insurance companies. From www.kevinmd.com Clipped from: www.kevinmd.com (share this clip)   Under direct primary care, patients are allowed to access a set of prearranged healthcare services which can include same and next-day appointments, unhurried office visits, at a very affordable fixed monthly fee. Direct primary care can lower costs by 40% or more Allowing for Direct Primary Care in the new law is the only element that I believe can actually bend the cost curve, as it removes 40+% of the cost out of the equation. Previously, that has gone to insurance overhead and profits. A relatively little-known provision in the law creates an affordable new choice for individuals and businesses by allowing flat-fee direct primary care practices to compete within the state-based insurance exchanges. This is where many Americans and small businesses will be able to shop for health coverage beginning in 2014 although there’s no need to wait until then from a consumer perspective. From www.kevinmd.com Direct primary care practices do not deal with insurance payment. DPC provides access to a health savings account (HAS) and a high deductible health plan (HDHP) which gets rid of the annoyances of dealing with health insurers.   When faced with a 50% increase in premium costs for a model they aren’t particularly satisfied with, it’s not hard to imagine individuals and employers moving en masse to a model that not only costs less but delivers a dramatically higher level of service. As a result, the MLR combined with Direct Primary Care is likely to blow a gigantic hole in insurance companies’ business. From www.kevinmd.com To understand more on direct primary care, be sure to visit http://dpcnews.com for more information.  ...

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Health Insurers Worried Over Direct Primary Care Model

Posted by on Jul 17, 2012 in Blog, DPC News | 0 comments

Health Insurers Worried Over Direct Primary Care Model

Before there was direct primary care, “concierge” or VIP medicine catered only to the wealthy sector of society, creating a more distinguished level of health care for those who can pay the price. Today, however, many health care providers all over the country are starting to adopt a new version of concierge medicine but this time no longer just for those who can afford. An article posted by Ibanga Umanah on JUMP  cites Qliance as “… a model of primary care that cuts the insurance company out in an effort to simplify the entire health care process.”   Clipped from: www.jumpassociates.com (share this clip)   Below is an excerpt from the article : The thing is, Qliance’s is not health insurance. It’s a new payment model. In a recent New York Times article Qliance is referred to as direct primary care. It’s an approach insurance companies are deeply worried about. After all, as Qliance says, “we operate outside the insurance system.” Qliance is almost like concierge medicine – personal, 24/7 care, but no longer just for the wealthy. From www.jumpassociates.com Since it is not insurance, the direct primary care model has opened the door to a more affordable health care to a lot of people, including small employers and the uninsured.   Dr. Erika Bliss, Qliance’s CEO, liked the concierge association – just pay the doctor a fair price directly. You skip the whole insurance ordeal entirely. “We want to grow this and bring the price point down to the average American,” Dr. Bliss explains. From www.jumpassociates.com   To learn more on direct primary care and its many benefits, visit http://dpcnews.com for more information.  ...

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CalPERS Looks at Junking Its Healthcare Plans

Posted by on Jul 11, 2012 in DPC News | 0 comments

CalPERS Looks at Junking Its Healthcare Plans

With its $7-billion annual medical bill going up by nearly 10% next year, The California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS) looks at junking healthcare plans. With CalPERS being the third largest purchaser of health insurance in the country, California’s big insurers aren’t too happy about it. In an article written for Forbes.com, author Dave Chase quoted a news excerpt from LATimes.com. “The California Public Employees’ Retirement System is preparing to rebid its health insurance business this fall for 1.3 million members, and two of its current plans, Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield of California, are likely to face intense competition as the giant pension fund considers its options. Perhaps the boldest move under consideration for 2014 would be to bypass insurers altogether in some areas of the state and begin contracting for medical services directly with large physician groups.” The Need for a Better Healthcare Version? Other healthcare companies and employers are taking a close look to see which direction CalPERS is heading. Because of its sheer size, CalPERS is virtually a bellwether and people will follow wherever it goes. “There is no mistaking they want a new version of healthcare,” Donald Crane, chief executive of the California Assn. of Physician Groups said. Dave Chase wrote: “They don’t have to look far. One of the pioneers (MedLion) of the most promising rethink of healthcare delivery called Direct Primary Care is based in California. MedLion is so affordable that roughly one-third of their members are uninsured. The slides below outline the history of Direct Primary Care, its little-noticed inclusion in Obamacare and the impressive cost savings and patient satisfaction they have achieved. While the health insurance has the lowest average satisfaction rating of any industry, Qliance has a consumer satisfaction rating higher than Google or Apple.” Read more Dave Chase also mentions another healthcare leader who applies the Direct Primary Care model. “Another Direct Primary Care leader has previously been featured in the famous “Hot Spotters” article from the New Yorker. As highlighted in that article, Dr. Rushika Fernandopulle’s Iora Health has worked with unions to identify the most expensive, high risk members and apply a more intensive primary care model. While CalPERS is experiencing continued healthcare hyperinflation, Iora Health’s union clientele have actually seen their healthcare costs lowered across the board.” Read more How MedLion, Qliance, and Iora Health do it as well as their cost outcomes are in complete contrast to the “get less for more” packages employers and CalPERS members have been used to. “Continuing down this path, CalPERS would be the living embodiment of the definition of insanity — i.e., doing the same thing and expecting a different outcome. The only surprise is it has taken them this long to force the issue. I could imagine any number of physician groups would be happy to deploy a Direct Primary Care model that cut out the massive insurance bureaucracy that burdens the equivalent of taking one’s car to the Jiffy Lube.” Read more Since it is not insurance, Direct Primary Care  can improve patient care because it will: allow more people to access healthcare at a much lower cost enable employers to provide medical benefits to their workers allow primary care doctors to spend more time on their patients and not on insurance payments processing. For...

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Direct Primary Care Can Lower Health Care Costs by 40% or More

Posted by on Jul 4, 2012 in DPC News | 0 comments

Direct Primary Care Can Lower Health Care Costs by 40% or More

One of two provisions of Obamacare that goes hardly noticed deals with Direct Primary Care Medical Homes or DPC. This provision can have a long-term effect that can wreak heavy damage to the traditional health insurance business and, at the same time, create new opportunities for health care providers in the country. In an article written by Dave Chase for Forbes.com entitled Health Insurance’s $4.4 Billion Bunker Buster – Part I, he mentions that Obamacare allows the Direct Primary Care model to compete with state-based insurance exchanges. Dave Chase is the CEO of Avado.com and former Accenture Senior Consultant before establishing Microsoft’s Health platform business. Dave Chase writes: “The second is allowing flat-fee primary care practices, also referred to as Direct Primary Care Medical Homes (DPC for short), to compete within the state-based insurance exchanges. The DPC models have a membership model that isn’t insurance-based and so they avoid the 40% or more of the costs associated with insurance that doesn’t positively impact patient well-being.”   Read more   Direct Primary Care is not insurance. By reducing or eliminating insurance co-pays, co insurance fees, and deductibles, it can remove many of the financial barriers to health care access. DPC will also enable small employers to provide medical benefits to their workers. “The better alternative for the buyer of healthcare is DPC combined with a high deductible wrap-around insurance policy. When a large employer has a concentration of employees in one location, they are also increasingly using onsite clinics. For smaller employers, DPC enables the similar objective of expanding access to primary care which employers, unions and others recognize as the best bang for the buck as outlined in “Primary Care Spring” unleashed by IBM.”   Read more Author Dave Chase writes that Direct Primary Care, by eliminating health insurance, can actually bring down the cost of health care by as much as 40% or even more. “Allowing for DPC is the best example in Obamacare of what can actually bend the cost curve, as it removes 40+% of the cost out of the equation. Previously, that 40% has gone to insurance overhead and profits. This relatively little-known provision in the law creates an affordable new choice for individuals and businesses by allowing flat-fee DPC practices to compete within the state-based insurance exchanges.”   Read more In the excerpt below, the author enumerates the advantages of Direct Primary Care membership. “Today, flat-fee practices offer affordable, high-quality health care at up to 40 percent less than the cost of traditional insurance, even when combined with a lower-cost “wrap-around” insurance plan. Benefits of DPC membership vary by provider, but typically include many of the following:     Unhurried 30- to 60-minute office visits versus typical 10 minute  appointments     No limits for pre-existing conditions     No deductibles or co-pays     Open or accessible 7 days per week, with 24 hour cell phone and email access to a physician     Low, predictable monthly fees plus savings on third-party wrap-around insurance plans     On-site x-ray, laboratory and “first-fill” prescription drug dispensary     Routine care including vaccinations, routine blood tests, women’s health services, pediatric care, on-site procedures and ongoing management of chronic conditions Read more The concept behind the direct primary care model is that patients can have almost unlimited direct access to medical care for...

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